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Sunday, November 5
 

8:00am

8:00am

8:30am

9:00am

9:45am

GIS Educator's Day User Session. Engaging Students with mosquito-borne diseases in GIS
AUTHORS: Rebecca Boger, Brooklyn College, CUNY; Russanne Low, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies

ABSTRACT: A new citizen science initiative, the GLOBE Observer (GO) Mosquito Habitat Mapper app was launched in May 2017. This app, available for both Apple and Android mobile devices, allows citizen scientists to collect and submit data that includes photos of larvae mosquito genus or species, type of water source (e.g., container or pond) where the larvae were found, and whether the standing water has been eliminated. The geolocated data are available through the GLOBE database (www.globe.gov). The health crises around vector-borne diseases provides an excellent venue to engage students in learning about a variety of topics including where mosquito breeding habitats occur, who may be at most risk, and what are the costs associated with tackling the spread and ultimate elimination of diseases such as Zika, dengue fever, malaria, and West Nile virus. Data collected by this app can be integrated will other spatial datasets to conduct a wide variety of spatial analysis using AGO and desktop GIS. In this way, students bring together environmental science, social justice, and economic perspectives. The analyses can be about the communities where they live or elsewhere around the world. We will show examples of the types of spatial analyses that can be conducted with the mosquito data and the educational materials that have been created for the app.

Sunday November 5, 2017 9:45am - 10:15am
TBA

9:45am

GIS Educator's Day Hands-on, BYOD Session. Collecting, mapping, and analyzing field work with Survey 123
AUTHORS: Joseph Kerski, Esri

ABSTRACT: Survey123 combines the ease of form based field data collection tools with citizen science and interactive web mapping and analysis.  This tool can be used to map anything from trees on your campus to broken sidewalks or water quality in your community, and much more.  Discover how you can easily set up your own surveys, and  how to map and analyze the results.

Sunday November 5, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
TBA

9:45am

GIS Educator's Day Hands-on, BYOD Session. What’s new in ArcGIS Online? The Instructional Guide for the ArcGIS Book
AUTHORS: Kathryn Keranen, James Madison University

ABSTRACT: There’s always something new to explore in the dynamic and constantly-evolving problem-solving tool called ArcGIS Online: customizable basemaps, smart mapping tools, and easy scripting tools such as ArcGIS Arcade. This session will highlight and provide hands-on  practice with some of the most exciting new developments in ArcGIS Online through exercises and lessons from the new (free!) second edition of The Instructional Guide for the ArcGIS Book.

Sunday November 5, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
TBA

10:15am

GIS Educator's Day User Session. Crowd-sourced shellfish survey: Using ArcGIS Online mapping tools with students in the field
AUTHORS: Jack Buckley, Cohasset Center for Student Coastal Research; Susan Bryant, Cohasset Center for Student Coastal Research; CSCR students; and Dr. Sara Grady, MassBays (Massachusetts Bays National Estuary Program)

ABSTRACT: The Cohasset Center for Student Coastal Research partnered with the Gulf Association (watershed stewardship group) and with Dr. Sara Grady, South Shore Regional Coordinator for the Mass Bays Program to engage students in collecting field data about shellfish beds in the Gulf River. ArcDesktop was used for creating the feature service published in ArcGIS online. Students used esri's Collector app on their mobile devices for collecting geo-referenced shellfish data (shellfish type, quantity, sediment type). Students will be using analysis tools during the summer of 2017 to publish a report for community stakeholders who wish to take conservation and restoration action to allow shellfish beds to thrive in the Gulf River and Cohasset Harbor.

Sunday November 5, 2017 10:15am - 10:45am
TBA

11:00am

GIS Educator's Day User Session. Instructional rubric for GIS lessons
AUTHORS: Jerry Bartz, Brookhaven College

ABSTRACT: The basic assessment rubric can be modified into an instructional instrument to improve the mastery of and the assessment efficiency of the GIS lesson objectives. The rubric is presented as an Excel Spreadsheet. The TASKs are arranged in sequential order to achieve lesson completion and may include specific directives to clarify textbook provided instructions. The POINT values reflect the level of effort to complete the TASK. Each task has a unique Reference Area number used to effectively communicate compliance with the TASK objective. A Frequently Missed column alerts students to TASKS that might need additional scrutiny. Anecdotal data from discussions with students has led to the conclusion that this rubric modification has both instructional effectiveness and efficient assessment of lessons used for regular and dual credit college GIS courses.

Sunday November 5, 2017 11:00am - 11:30am
TBA

11:00am

GIS Educator's Day Hands-on, BYOD Session. Step up your GIS game with power of imagery: The Instructional Guide for the ArcGIS Imagery Book
AUTHORS: Kathryn Keranen, James Madison University

ABSTRACT: The exponential growth in the number of Earth-orbiting satellites as well as the rapid proliferation of UAV’s provide us with thousands of remotely sensed views of Earth every hour of every day. This imagery is used to answer questions and solve problems in fields from agriculture to disaster response to urban planning. This session will provide practice in the easy integration of imagery with GIS in ArcGIS Online. Using activities and lessons from the new The Instructional Guide for the ArcGIS Imagery Book, participants will use imagery to explore, analyze, and investigate real-world issues from the past, present and future. 

Sunday November 5, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
TBA

11:00am

GIS Educator's Day User Session. Utilization of a small UAS for natural resource mapping
AUTHORS: Christina Montello, Gregory Bonynge, Christopher Damon, and Peter August - University of Rhode Island

ABSTRACT: Napatree Point Conservation Area in Westerly, Rhode Island, was the focus of a new Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) data development project by the University of Rhode Island Environmental Data Center. Data were collected using a DJI Phantom 4 Pro consumer UAV. Although not designed for mapping purposes, this relatively low-cost solution proved itself effective for small-scale mapping projects. Baseline imagery of Napatree to be used in monitoring storm-induced habitat and sand dune changes as well as imagery for mapping submerged aquatic vegetation mapping were obtained through nadir grid missions. Pix4DMapper Pro was used to process the imagery, generating digital surface models and orthomosaics, which were in turn interpreted using Esri ArcGIS Desktop. The spatial distribution of boat anchorage off Napatree was determined using videos and ArcGIS Full Motion Viewer. Even though there are limitations to using consumer UAVs for gathering geospatial data, this project demonstrates their utility and cost effectiveness.

Sunday November 5, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
TBA

11:30am

GIS Educator's Day User Session. Tips and Tricks for using an ArcGIS Organization account in K12 schools and classrooms
AUTHORS: Mike Wagner, Loudoun County Public Schools and James Madison University

ABSTRACT: You finally got your ArcGIS Online subscription account - now what? This presentation will share tips and tricks for getting the most out of an ArcGIS Online organization in the classroom and in schools. You’ll learn how to use groups to foster collaboration and sharing among students, how to create custom student roles, to set up your organization’s home page, quickly add and delete organization accounts, and to monitor your organization’s credit usage. Anyone responsible for administering an ArcGIS Online organization will leave this session with many new insights.

Sunday November 5, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
TBA

12:00pm

12:00pm

Vendor Set-up
Sunday November 5, 2017 12:00pm - 5:00pm
TBA

12:45pm

GIS Educator's Day. KEYNOTE ADDRESS by Joseph Kerski - 'Five forces catapulting geography onto the world stage'
Five forces catapulting geography onto the world stage
Joseph Kerski, PhD, Education Industry Curriculum Development Manager, Esri  

Five converging global trends are shaping the way geography is taught and perceived today. These trends—geoawareness, geoenablement, geotechnologies, storytelling, and citizen science--represent a window of opportunity to foster and advance geoliteracy throughout education and society. Join Joseph Kerski as we discuss how GIS and spatial thinking at all levels of education is critical to reaching this goal and how you as an educator are key to its success. 

Sunday November 5, 2017 12:45pm - 1:30pm
TBA

1:00pm

Explore Newport On Own
Arriving early? Newport has a lot to offer! Here are some things to do while in the area: 
  • Tour a Mansion
  • Walk the Cliff Walk
  • Take a Drive or Bike Ocean Drive
  • Visit the Tennis Hall of Fame
  • Visit Fort Adams
  • Fly a Kite at Brenton Point
  • Hike Sachuest Point National Wildlife Refuge
  • Do a wine tasting at Newport or Greenvale Vineyards
  • Taste Beer and Rum at Newport Storm
  • Poke through the many shops downtown
  • Have lunch at one of the many fabulous restaurants
  • Visit Beavertail Lighthouse in Jamestown
  • Tour the National Museum of American Illustration
  • Visit Rose Island Lighthouse
  • Visit the Newport Art Museum
  • Tour the Audrain Automobile Museum

Sunday November 5, 2017 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Offsite

1:35pm

2:15pm

GIS Educator's Day User Session. Using Collector for ArcGIS in vocational education
AUTHORS: Ann Witzig, Essex, Essex Tech High School

ABSTRACT: ArcGIS Collector, in concert with GeoInquiries and Story Maps, meets Career Technical Education (CTE) demands for a technology-savvy workforce.  CTE instructors can utilize these student-centered applications in many diverse areas: health assisting, electrical, plumbing, agricultural engineering, and environmental technology.  This toolbox allows teachers to engage a diversity of student learning styles in literacy, produce original data collections, create meaningful analyses, and complete a public presentation of project results. Active, student learning centered on data collection and interpretation engages all learners while addressing the increasing need for a technology- literate workforce.

Sunday November 5, 2017 2:15pm - 2:45pm
TBA

2:15pm

GIS Educator's Day Hands-on, BYOD Session. Communicating and assessing student work with Story Maps
AUTHORS: Joseph Kerski, Esri

ABSTRACT: Story maps combine live interactive web maps with audio, video, photographs, and narrative.  Discover how you can teach with existing story maps and build and share your own multimedia story maps, and empower your students to create their own story maps covering issues that they are learning about.

Sunday November 5, 2017 2:15pm - 3:15pm
TBA

2:15pm

GIS Educator's Day User Session. The Esri Map Competition for Schools (Panel)
PANELISTS: Ina Ahern, Bob Woolner, Lara Bryant, New Hampshire Educational GS Partnership

ABSTRACT: Sponsored by Esri and designed to challenge students to “create and share maps about something in their home states”  this competition can motivate your students to do more with GIS.  Visit http://education.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapSeries/index.html?appid=c369c6d9bb6d4232bb3ad066cd5b9280  and click on the blue circular “2” on the top of the page to view a presentation showing participating states and winning entries for the inaugural year.  Then come learn how two teachers (one middle and one high school) supported their students as they prepared maps for this project and how the state level competition can be organized.

Sunday November 5, 2017 2:15pm - 3:15pm
TBA

2:45pm

GIS Educator's Day User Session. Spatial Statistics Case Studies: The what and how of analysis
AUTHORS: Glenn Hazelton, Ph.D., Northeastern University

ABSTRACT: Over the past few years I have been teaching Spatial Statistics at Northeastern University in Boston. My students have been both undergrad and graduate level. In this presentation I will review a number of the projects that have been developed by these students. I will discuss the methods of analysis used and the trends in both projects and analysis techniques. The complexities of teaching advanced GIS to different kinds of students will also be presented. My hope is to generate a discussion that will help all of us to work with students effectively and do significant analysis.

Sunday November 5, 2017 2:45pm - 3:15pm
TBA

3:30pm

GIS Educator's Day User Session. Using GIS maps and apps for non-geography majors
AUTHORS: Seth Dixon, Rhode Island College

ABSTRACT: ArcGIS online, especially StoryMaps, are powerful tools that can be used by undergraduate students to communicate spatial information, scientific data, organize information, or to craft an argument.  Too often, only students from a few select majors are ever exposed to cartographic skills and GIS platforms.  Students from a diverse set of academic background can benefit from using geospatial tools; in this session I will discuss strategies to design courses that will attract students to a cartography/mapping course beyond the typical students and increase interdisciplinary of GIS on campus.  

Sunday November 5, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

GIS Educator's Day Hands-on, BYOD Session. ArcGIS Pro: is it for you?
AUTHORS: Kathryn Keranen, James Madison University; Joseph Kerski, Esri

ABSTRACT: If you’re like most GIS-using educators, you have a host of questions about ArcGIS Pro…What is ArcGIS Pro, how does it compare with ArcMap, why you would want to switch to it, how do you use it in K16 education, and how do licensing issues affect the answers to the above? This hands-on session will provide practice with ArcGIS Pro tools, functions, and work flow. Presenters Kathryn Keranen and Joseph Kerski will also answer your questions about implementation of ArcGIS Pro in your own educational setting.

Sunday November 5, 2017 3:30pm - 4:30pm
TBA

3:30pm

GIS Educator's Day Hands-on, BYOD. No-Stress Choropleth: mapping Census Bureau data online
AUTHORS: David J Kraiker*, US CENSUS BUREAU Alexandra S Barker, US CENSUS BUREAU

ABSTRACT: The Census Bureau continuously provides demographic, economic and housing-unit data that can be downloadedto use with Gis applications. But did you know that you can also map it on-line using the mapping feature (ESRI-created) that our Map Tab houses? This is an easy way for students to create one-variable maps, see different ways to categorize data for choropleth maps, and have fun with coloration - all before downloading the data and shapefiles. In this workshop, participants are invited to bring their won devices and follow along.

Sunday November 5, 2017 3:30pm - 4:30pm
TBA

4:00pm

GIS Educator's Day User Session. Using Collector for ArcGIS in a college environmental science course
AUTHORS: William Hansen, John Holbrook - Worcester State University

ABSTRACT: Field activities in Earth and Environmental Sciences are an integral component of the educational process. Using Data Collector for ArcGIS allows simultaneous data acquisition in a field activity without the expense of GPS units that need to be shared in large groups. Using a Geodatabase and ArcGIS Online a set of data collection experiences and subsequent data analyses were developed for Pond Water Quality, vegetation sampling and stream sediment and structure sampling. Students find the interface more intuitive than the stylus based ArcPad application used previously in the field activities and with virtually every student using an input device, the volume of data allows more opportunity for subsequent analysis using desktop GIS. Analyses were conducted using the student collected data and a large database of existing data collected in the same areas over the past 10 years.

Sunday November 5, 2017 4:00pm - 4:30pm
TBA

4:30pm

5:00pm

Welcome Mixer
Come join fellow NEARCers for an improv comedy show by Bit Players at the Fire House Theater – hors d'oeuvres and some beer/wine will be provided but it’s also BYOB so feel free to bring your own! Additional fee of $45 and advance registration required.

Sunday November 5, 2017 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Offsite: Fire House Theater 4 Equality Park Pl, Newport, RI 02840
 
Monday, November 6
 

7:30am

Continental Breakfast
Monday November 6, 2017 7:30am - 9:00am
TBA

7:30am

Vendor Set-Up
Monday November 6, 2017 7:30am - 11:30am
TBA

7:30am

8:00am

9:00am

WELCOME & KEYNOTE ADDRESS by Andrew Turner, Esri
Keynote Speakers

Monday November 6, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
TBA

10:00am

Poster Set-Up
Monday November 6, 2017 10:00am - 4:00pm
TBA

10:15am

Refreshment Break
Monday November 6, 2017 10:15am - 10:30am
TBA

10:30am

Esri Technical Session. ArcGIS Maps for Office: GIS for Everybody
AUTHOR: Mark Scott, Esri

ABSTRACT: ArcGIS Maps for Office adds a new perspective to the spreadsheet experience, by allowing you to see your data on a map inside Excel. See how to make your data come alive and reveal a story that can impact decision making, then share the results with other users in or outside of your organization, to help make better decisions.

Monday November 6, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Salon IV

10:30am

User Session. Creating New Bathymetric Maps for Massachusetts Lakes and Ponds
AUTHORS: David Szczebak, Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife

ABSTRACT: The Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife has provided anglers and boaters with maps showing pond and lake bathymetry since the 1940s and 1950s. Technology has changed a lot since that time. To create new pond maps, biologists use GPS sounders to record depth measurements and GPS coordinates. This information is imported into GIS and run through several interpolation techniques to produce depth contours.While the original pond maps were created using anywhere between 50 and 150 data points, new maps often incorporate 8,000 to 12,000 points. The new statistical and data collection techniques, combined with a roughly 100-fold increase in the amount of data, result in pond maps that are far better representations of actual bathymetry.

Monday November 6, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Salon III

10:30am

User Session. Developing Bicycle & Pedestrian Inventories with ArcGIS Enterprise
AUTHORS: Quinn Molloy, MassDOT

ABSTRACT: In an effort to identify and track the development of alternative transportation facilities within the Commonwealth, MassDOT GIS has worked to redevelop our authoritative bicycle inventory and initiate a similar inventory of pedestrian routes. The Bicycle Inventory has existed as a MassDOT product for a number of years, but new advents in technology have allowed the Office of Transportation Planning to rebuild the dataset to better represent existing conditions while using public opinion to develop new facilities. The Pedestrian Inventory uses a linear referenced road characteristic editor to clean existing sidewalk data and capture a statewide network of off road pedestrian or mixed use trails. The development process incorporated elements of public facing data capture technology, an SDE editing environment, ArcGIS Server, and our GeoDOT platforms.

Monday November 6, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Salon I

10:30am

User Session. Life After VBA and MDBs
AUTHORS: Don Katnik*, Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife

ABSTRACT: It turns out that Esri was serious about getting rid of VBA. With version 10.4, my last few custom tools imploded with spectacular application crashes (sorry for the inconvenience!). So, what now? If there is anyone else left out there who has not migrated away from VBA, this presentation will demonstrate a less-painful-and-expensive-than-imagined path forward using Visual Studio (because - "let’s be honest" - as powerful as Python is, its GUI capabilities just don’t compare). Concurrent with my GUI needs I also have many scripts and tools that query data tables. These were written originally for Access MDB files that now will be migrated to the “new” ACCDB format (I know! They’re only 10 years outdated) and, finally, to SQL Server (everyone smile and nod approvingly). Rather than rewrite code embedded in dozens of Python scripts and Arc tools I created a Python module specifically for querying tables that will handle shapefiles, file GDBs, Access MDBs or ACCDBs, and SQL Server. It seems to work and maybe some of you will find it clever and want to copy it, OR (more likely) you will have much more elegant ideas for how to accomplish the same thing and may feel inspired to share them during the Q&A. So I will present what I’ve done and see what happens.

Monday November 6, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Salon II

10:30am

User Session. Progress in NOAA’s High Resolution Land Cover Mapping Program
AUTHORS: Jamie Carter*, The Baldwin Group at NOAA OCM; Nate Herold, NOAA OCM; Chris Robinson, TBG at NOAA OCM; John McCombs, TBG at NOAA OCM

ABSTRACT: NOAA’s Office for Coastal Management (OCM) provides technical assistance, data, tools, and training to the coastal management community. Through its Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP), OCM has been producing moderate resolution (30 meter) land cover for almost two decades. During the 2016 NEARC conference, NOAA announced an ambitious new effort to establish an operational high resolution (1 meter) land cover product line. This presentation will describe techniques NOAA and its partners are using to develop detailed land cover maps across broadening geographies, and will discuss progress to date in New England and other regions. We will compare and contrast the high resolution products to the moderate resolution products and discuss how the two products relate to each other from development and usability perspectives. We will highlight other detailed classified data products like salt marsh data and describe how these techniques, combined with invaluable partner input, will guide our future high resolution land cover mapping efforts.

Monday November 6, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Freedom

10:30am

User Session. Using Geospatial Technology to Bridge the Gap Between Intergenerational Learners
AUTHORS: Cary Chadwick*, David Dickson, and Emily Wilson - University of Connecticut Center for Land use Education and Research (CLEAR)

ABSTRACT: Adults and adolescents can learn a lot from each other. At least that’s the theory that Extension Educators from the University of Connecticut’s Natural Resources Conservation Academy (NRCA) have set out to prove. The team of educators have developed a new, innovative program in conservation and land use planning that engages intergenerational learners - high school students and adult conservation volunteers - in informal geospatial STEM learning. The Academy’s Conservation Training Partnership (CTP) is a two-day, immersive training that partners adolescents with adults and is focused on employing geospatial technologies to teach practical approaches to conservation stewardship. The workshops focus on free smartphone apps for collecting field data including GPS data and digital field surveys. Participants are also taught how to showcase their data on interactive web maps and story maps. The participants then goes on to complete a conservation project together in their community. Both the projects and participants benefit from intergenerational partnerships because of the different approaches to learning and varied skill sets each age group contributes. Adolescents are often adept at learning technology and conservation-minded adults bring their connection to nature and their commitment and engagement in community service. This presentation will describe the methods used in the program to bridge these two groups of learners to produce effective, efficient conservation outcomes and will include a detailed overview of the free smartphone mapping apps employed in the training.

Monday November 6, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Weatherly

10:30am

CONCURRENT USER SESSIONS
Monday November 6, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
TBA

10:30am

11:00am

Esri Technical Session. ArcGIS Pro Basics: Editing Data and Making Maps
AUTHOR: Jeff Bigos, Esri

ABSTRACT: ArcGIS Pro is a project-based desktop GIS for the GeoSpatial Professional. With is you can build projects from your maps, data, analytical models, and collaborate with others in your organization and share your work with everyone on the web. In this session, learn some of the basic capabilities, common workflows and resources to begin editing and making maps with ArcGIS Pro.

Monday November 6, 2017 11:00am - 11:30am
Salon IV

11:00am

User Session. A Data-Driven Approach to School Re-districting
AUTHORS: Priya Sankalia, Project Manager, AppGeo

ABSTRACT: Many New England communities are facing increasing populations and school overcrowding. The challenge for school districts is equitable distribution of students and resources. By loading student distribution and municipal data into analysis tools such as CARTO and ArcGIS, various redistricting scenarios can be created and shared with stakeholders including families, school committee members and school administrators. Visualization and analysis tools help clarify the proposed solutions, explore alternatives and reach consensus more quickly. This presentation will share the technological approach and how to leverage geospatial technology to advance contentious discussions.

Monday November 6, 2017 11:00am - 11:30am
Salon I

11:00am

User Session. NHDPlus High Resolution
AUTHORS: Dan Walters, US Geological Survey

ABSTRACT: After a several years of hard work by a dedicated team of USGS employees, contractors, and state and local NHD and WBD stewards, the first NHDPlus High Resolution (NHDPlus HR) datasets are now available in Beta format. The NHDPlus High Resolution (NHDPlus HR) is a scalable geospatial hydrography framework built from the high resolution National Hydrography Dataset, nationally complete Watershed Boundary Dataset, and 3D Elevation Program data. The NHDPlus HR brings modeling and assessment down to a local, neighborhood level, while nesting seamlessly into the national context. This presentation will provide an overview of the development of the NHDPlus HR dataset and availability, details about the “ingredient databases” and the data model including the value added attributes and discuss current and potential applications.

Monday November 6, 2017 11:00am - 11:30am
Freedom

11:00am

User Session. Quantifying Land Cover Change and Dispersal Relative to Non-Native Pine Species
AUTHORS: Caroline A. Curtis*, Graduate Program in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, University of Massachusetts Amherst; Valerie J. Pasquarella, Postdoctoral Fellow, Northeast Climate Science Center, University of Massachusetts Amherst; Bethany A. Bradley, Department of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts Amherst

ABSTRACT: Non-native pines are established in plantations throughout the southern hemisphere and, in many areas, have escaped and spread into the surrounding ecosystem. These invasive populations alter ecosystem function and threaten native species. In Chile, some studies have quantified land cover change relative to non-native pines and have generally found a decrease in native forest and an increase in non-native pine since the 1980’s. However, in measuring land cover change, these studies fail to differentiate increasing plantation size and invaded areas, which is an important distinction for conservation and management of native ecosystems in Chile. The large spatial extent and high detectability of non-native pines provides a unique opportunity to apply remotely sensed data to quantify current land cover and model land cover change through time. I downloaded all high quality Landsat images for scenes in Chile in which invasion occurred. For each scene, I created reference data and identified invaded areas based on Google Earth images. I used time series models to quantify spatiotemporal patterns of land cover change and the Random Forest algorithm to classify images and create land cover maps. By separating plantations from invaded areas, I can better understand how non-native pines impact native ecosystems and how dispersal proceeds across the landscape.

Monday November 6, 2017 11:00am - 11:30am
Salon III

11:00am

User Session. Using Collector for ARCGIS in a College Environmental Science Course
AUTHORS: William Hansen*, John Holbrook – Worcester State University

ABSTRACT: Field activities in Earth and Environmental Sciences are an integral component of the educational process. Using Data Collector for ArcGIS allows simultaneous data acquisition in a field activity without the expense of GPS units that need to be shared in large groups. Using a Geodatabase and ArcGIS Online a set of data collection experiences and subsequent data analyses were developed for Pond Water Quality, vegetation sampling and stream sediment and structure sampling. Students find the interface more intuitive than the stylus based ArcPad application used previously in the field activities and with virtually every student using an input device, the volume of data allows more opportunity for subsequent analysis using desktop GIS. Analyses were conducted using the student collected data and a large database of existing data collected in the same areas over the past 10 years.

Monday November 6, 2017 11:00am - 11:30am
Weatherly

11:00am

User Session. Using the ArcGIS API for Python in Cambridge
AUTHORS: Sean Sweeney, City of Cambridge

ABSTRACT: The new ArcGIS API for Python has greatly simplified automation with ArcGIS Online and Portal for ArcGIS. It abstracts away most of the gory low-level details that used to be required to interact with the ArcGIS REST API. Get a brief overview of what the ArcGIS API for Python is and how it fits into the Esri developer ecosystem, and demos of some of the ways that Cambridge is trying take advantage of this new tool.

Monday November 6, 2017 11:00am - 11:30am
Salon II

11:30am

Vendor Area Opens
Monday November 6, 2017 11:30am - 11:30am
TBA

11:30am

Esri Technical Session. Web App Builder: Code-free development
AUTHOR: Adam Ziegler, Esri

ABSTRACT: Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS is a pure HTML5/JavaScript-based application that allows you to create your own intuitive, fast, and beautiful web apps without writing a single line of code. The app uses new ArcGIS platform features and modern browser technology to provide both flexible and powerful capabilities such as 3D visualization of data. In addition, developers have an opportunity to create custom tools and app themes through the extensibility framework. Come to this session to learn how you can configure GIS apps that run seamlessly across all devices.

Monday November 6, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Salon IV

11:30am

User Session. Building a Robust Multimodal Network in the Greater Bridgeport Region
AUTHORS: Mark Hoover*, Mark Goetz, and George Obeng – CT Metropolitan Council of Governments

ABSTRACT: As a transportation planning agency, we are tasked with modeling the movement of people and goods in our region. While much of this activity leverages road and rail networks to model movement, it does not adequately represent all modes of transportation. For example, when modeling pedestrian transit choices, ¼ and ½ mile buffers from existing bus routes are used as surrogates to model walksheds and accessibly to transit. This crude approach often has confusing results. To most accurately model movement we built a robust multimodal network. The network includes vehicular, rail, bus, ferry, bicycle, and pedestrian travel. This presentation will detail the labor-intensive process of creating the feature classes for each mode of transportation (sidewalks, bus routes, etc.) as well as modeling the travel speed and connectivity in the network. We will also discuss preliminary routing and service area results using different modes of transportation and how we are using that information to guide decision making with local transit authorities.

Monday November 6, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Salon I

11:30am

User Session. Campus Cleanup: Soil Remediation at an Urban University Campus
AUTHORS: Stephen Washburn*, GIS Analyst, GZA in Norwood, MA

ABSTRACT: I will present a project specific example of how GIS and Python were used as the foundation for 2D and 3D data driven mapping and analysis of an environmental data set comprised of over 650 data points/samples._x000D_
The project site is on the active campus of a university located in a densely urbanized area of Boston, Massachusetts. The project involved the analysis, excavation or treatment, and management of over 100,000 tons of soil. In many instances, soil excavation depths were greater than 20 feet below ground surface. Custom Python scripts were used to automate the classification of laboratory analytical results. ArcGIS was used to generate 2D maps, web maps that made use of the ArcGIS mobile application, and 3D features that were used in volumetric calculations and 3D visualization._x000D_
GIS provided the advantage of not only generating the mapping and analytics we needed to classify and visualize the data but it also integrated seamlessly with our Python solutions. I believe this is a great example of how using GIS as the foundation for environmental data analysis, 2D mapping, web mapping, and 3D visualization can be of massive benefit to project efficiency, accuracy, and budget.

Monday November 6, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Salon II

11:30am

User Session. Spatial Statistics Case Studies: The What and How of Analysis
AUTHORS: Glenn Hazelton, Ph.D., Northeastern University

ABSTRACT: Over the past few years I have been teaching Spatial Statistics at Northeastern University in Boston. My students have been both undergrad and graduate level. In this presentation I will review a number of the projects that have been developed by these students. I will discuss the methods of analysis used and the trends in both projects and analysis techniques. The complexities of teaching advanced GIS to different kinds of students will also be presented. My hope is to generate a discussion that will help all of us to work with students effectively and do significant analysis.

Monday November 6, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Weatherly

11:30am

User Session. Update on Ocean Use Mapping in the Northeast
AUTHORS: Nick Napoli, NROC; Jenna Ducharme*, RPS ASA; Jeremy Fontenault*, RPS ASA; Ben Fish, RPS ASA; Kelly Knee, RPS ASA; Emily Shumchenia, NROC; Daniel Martin; NOAA

ABSTRACT: The Northeast Ocean Data Portal is an online data and information system developed by a consortium of private, nonprofit, and governmental organizations to support ocean planning in the Northeast. The portal provides access to cloud-based data products and interactive web maps that characterize marine resources and the use of ocean space, while also harnessing and providing access to a range of ocean management and planning resources within, and outside of, the region. This year, multiple datasets on the Portal have undergone updates, and there has been exciting new functionality added to give the user more control over the data viewing environment. This presentation will highlight some of the recent major updates. It will also demonstrate the new ability for users to view hundreds of individual fish, marine mammal, and bird species data layers with other data that supports ocean planning. Finally, this presentation will discuss how to access, interpret, and make decisions based on usage statistics for hosted ArcGIS Server map services that are publicly available. In addition, it will discuss ways these capabilities have helped shape decisions made by the Northeast Ocean Data Portal working group.

Monday November 6, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Salon III

11:30am

User Session. Using Imagery and Elevation Image Services
AUTHORS: Emily H. Wilson, University of Connecticut

ABSTRACT: Image services provide access to raster data through a web service. The CT ECO (Connecticut Environmental Conditions Online) website uses image services to share statewide, high resolution aerial imagery and statewide, lidar-derived DEMs (Digital Elevation Models). More than just a visual backdrop when accessed through ArcMap and ArcGIS Online, image services can be manipulated by changing settings such as band combinations, applying stretches and using functions. Image services are created with mosaic datasets - a virtual mosaic of multiple files, often tiles. The user can access and change mosaic settings like determining which files or tiles are displayed, how they overlap and which should be used in a geoprocessing tool. This presentation will demonstrate the capabilities of image services for aerial imagery and DEMs using examples from the CT ECO website (http://cteco.uconn.edu).

Monday November 6, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Freedom

12:00pm

1:30pm

Esri Technical Session. Spatial Analytics with ArcGIS Pro
AUTHOR: Krithica Kantharaj, Esri

ABSTRACT: Learn about geoprocessing and spatial analysis in the new ArcGIS Pro application. This session will walk you through simple and complex spatial analysis tools, ModelBuilder, how to save your geoprocessing history, and build workflows with Python all in the new ribbon based user experience provided in ArcGIS Pro.

Monday November 6, 2017 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Salon IV

1:30pm

User Session. Has Metadata Jumped the Shark? Current Practices and Trends
AUTHORS: Kate Hickey*, AppGeo

ABSTRACT: This talk will cover examples of current practices and trends in creating and maintaining digital geospatial metadata by State and Local governments. Brief case studies on a selected subset of representative State governments from different parts of the Nation will be presented, along with a selected subset of Local governments of various sizes and sophistication. Common characteristics across regions and levels of government will be discussed, including natural language descriptive metadata as well as formatted metadata (i.e. FGDC/ISO). Emerging trends and/or noteworthy developments will be covered, including: Convergence of geospatial with open data; curated data collections; metadata viewing; data storytelling; data profiling; and the use of GitHub as a metadata repository.

Monday November 6, 2017 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Salon I

1:30pm

User Session. Thermal Infrared Imagery Overview
AUTHORS: Drew Meren GISP, Quantum Spatial

ABSTRACT:
Quantum Spatial has provided thermal infrared (TIR) data for a breadth of applications both aquatic and terrestrial.  TIR imaging supports a wide range of projects in:
  • Biological studies in stream environments
  • Urban and facility energy efficiency
  • Groundwater discharge detection
  • Stream temperature dynamics
  • Subsurface thermal vents
  • Geothermal energy exploration
  • Illicit discharge detection
  • Forest fir mapping
In addition to the applications listed above, of TIR, this presentation will focus on the acquisition and interpretation of airborne TIR.

Monday November 6, 2017 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Salon III

1:30pm

User Session. Utilization of a Small UAS for Natural Resource Mapping
AUTHORS: Christina Montello*, Gregory Bonynge, Christopher Damon, and Peter August – University of Rhode Island

ABSTRACT: Napatree Point Conservation Area in Westerly, Rhode Island, was the focus of a new Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) data development project by the University of Rhode Island Environmental Data Center. Data were collected using a DJI Phantom 4 Pro consumer UAV. Although not designed for mapping purposes, this relatively low-cost solution proved itself effective for small-scale mapping projects. Baseline imagery of Napatree to be used in monitoring storm-induced habitat and sand dune changes as well as imagery for mapping submerged aquatic vegetation mapping were obtained through nadir grid missions. Pix4DMapper Pro was used to process the imagery, generating digital surface models and orthomosaics, which were in turn interpreted using Esri ArcGIS Desktop. The spatial distribution of boat anchorage off Napatree was determined using videos and ArcGIS Full Motion Viewer. Even though there are limitations to using consumer UAVs for gathering geospatial data, this project demonstrates their utility and cost effectiveness.

Monday November 6, 2017 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Weatherly

1:30pm

User Session. Web Mapping for Government with ArcGIS Enterprise and the Cloud: A Beginners Crash Course
AUTHORS: Thad J. Dymkowski, GISP*, Prime 3SG

ABSTRACT: This presentation will provide an introduction to Web mapping technology focusing on ArcGIS Enterprise and Cloud technology. It will cover the basic facets needed to begin pursuing this technology and considerations for employing it in your existing GIS scenario. Furthermore, it will highlight examples and available options for creating cloud based web maps.

Monday November 6, 2017 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Salon II

1:30pm

1:30pm

Workshop. Procedures for Improving the Quality of LiDAR Data
AUTHORS: Katrina Schweikert*, Blue Marble Geographics

ABSTRACT: In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that the availability of LiDAR data is expanding at a rate that is out-pacing the requisite knowledge and skills needed to effectively utilize the data. As a commodity, LiDAR is the raw material from which countless derivative products are created and, as with any production process, the quality of the raw material has a direct bearing on the quality of the final product. In this workshop, we will follow a series of workflows that address several of the inherent imperfections often encountered in off-the-shelf LiDAR data. We will begin by demonstrating several data editing and filtering techniques resulting from an initial analysis of the characteristics of the data. We will look at point classification types and how they can be visualized, queried, and manually edited. We will explore the process of automatically identifying and, if necessary, deleting noise points. We will walk through the steps required to automatically identify and reclassify ground and vegetation points, which form the basis for many 3D analysis techniques and volume calculations. We will show how to crop a point cloud to a predefined geographic boundary eliminating unnecessary points and reducing file size. We will explore the method for adjusting the LiDAR data, both horizontally and vertically, to adhere to surveyed ground control points. Finally, we will show how all of these data improvements can be incorporated into a new LAS or LAZ file.

Monday November 6, 2017 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Freedom

2:00pm

Esri Technical Session. ArcGIS Online Analytics
AUTHOR: Krithica Kantharaj, Esri

ABSTRACT: This session introduces the spatial analysis capabilities available with ArcGIS Online. The ArcGIS Online spatial analysis tools are hosted in the cloud by Esri, and are designed to provide an intuitive, user-friendly experience. They offer access to powerful analytics without requiring years of experience. With both tools and data now available in ArcGIS Online getting going with analysis has never been easier.

Monday November 6, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Salon IV

2:00pm

User Session. EPA's Valley Identification Tool
AUTHORS: Dan Morse,* EPA / ASRC Federal Vistronix; Alison Simcox, EPA

ABSTRACT: On cold winter nights, air pollution can be trapped in valleys by thermal inversions. EPA’s Region 1 and ASRC Federal Vistronix created the Valley Identification Tool (https://epa.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=646ebe715800410d9e5c02aa3653546d) to locate areas vulnerable to these conditions, for siting new air monitoring stations and for assisting lower-income communities with woodstove upgrades. Our Valley layer is built from a standard Digital Elevation Model, and delivered in an interactive web map that summarizes each town’s population in and out of valleys, and the locations of current air monitors as well as registered air pollution point sources. A companion web map is the Valley Profile Tool (https://epa.maps.arcgis.com/apps/Elevations/index.html?appid=d31cd5a0922c488097bca86e299d30dd) which lets users find the depth and breadth of valleys.

Monday November 6, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Salon II

2:00pm

User Session. Finding Common Ground: Measuring Smart Growth Performance and Potential in Rhode Island
AUTHORS: Edgar Adams*, Roger Williams University; Brian Boisvert, Brad Shapiro, Fenton Bradley

ABSTRACT: In this study we have used a weighted overlay module in ArchGIS to measure the capacity of designated rural Growth Centers to provide development opportunities that met with the State’s Land Use and Low and Moderate Income (LMI) housing goals. We evaluated both developed and undeveloped land to not only gauge the potential for new growth; but also the performance of existing development according to established Smart Growth objectives. This kind of analysis can allow local communities to determine where the most sustainable development sites are and whether there is adequate undeveloped land within designated Growth Centers to accommodate future growth, including state mandated LMI housing. These rural communities are, for the most part, not served with municipal water and sewer infrastructure. They are also among the fastest growing communities in the state and those with the lowest percentage of LMI Housing counting toward the state mandated 10% goal. This two part study helped inform and advance the discussion of Growth Center planning in Rhode Island, while also addressing the important role of more integrated and diverse housing choices for all of the state’s inhabitants. To do this we expanded our analysis to include data from the Kirwan Institute's Opportunity Index and employment information. This analysis highlighted the power of GIS to illuminate some of the most pressing and persistent issues facing our metropolitan regions including exclusionary zoning, job sprawl, inadequate infrastructure, and to facilitate more coordinated decision making.

Monday November 6, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Weatherly

2:00pm

User Session. The Evolution of Geospatial Data Accuracy Standards
AUTHORS: Ted Covill*, CP WSP USA

ABSTRACT: What are accuracy Standards? The U.S. Bureau of the Budget published the United Stated National Map Accuracy Standards in the 1940's. These standards were updated through-out the 1940's but remained unchanged until the 1990's when the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) published the ASPRS Accuracy Standards for Large-Scale Maps. The ASPRS Accuracy Standard was based more on real world positioning accuracy rather than an accuracy that is based on paper maps. Over the years new standards have been published by other agencies such as Federal Geodetic Data Committee, FEMA and the ASPRS to reflect the advances and introduction of new technologies. In 2014, the ASPRS introduced their new standard with the intent of condensing and override previous digital geospatial standards. These standards are often confusing and misunderstood. This presentation will attempt to explain the differences between the standards and how the standards relate to each other. We will discuss how the accuracy standards relate to the current data sets being utilized in the geospatial community such as orthophotography, planimetric mapping, Digital Terrain Models (DTM), contours, LiDAR and Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS, A.K.A. drones).

Monday November 6, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Salon I

2:00pm

User Session. Using Animation & Static Maps to Capture the Dynamic Phenomenon of Flooding on Farm Fields
AUTHORS: Caroline Alves, Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets

ABSTRACT: Water quality degradation in Lake Champlain and its tributaries has necessitated stricter regulations for the farming community in Vermont. Previously, floodplain farm fields had fewer restrictions placed on them in terms of cropping and nutrient application. Flat topography causes these areas to be considered “non- highly erodible”. Continuous corn can be grown in floodplains over many years. Heightened public awareness and advocacy by environmental groups has put pressure on regulators to formulate new rules to lessen sediment and nutrient loss in agricultural floodplains. Mapping out a spatially defined area of flooding risk has proved challenging. Farmers need to know exactly where they are expected to implement a higher level of management. _x000D_
In time, statewide lidar data and its derivatives will provide this detailed information. Where lidar is currently available, creating maps that show different degrees of flooding offer a starting point in conversations with farmers. New rules require adjustments in cropping, nutrient management and construction plans - all of which impact financial decisions. This talk will cover a variety of mapping approaches focused on how to delineate the unpredictable risk of flooding.

Monday November 6, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Salon III

2:30pm

Esri Technical Session. Insights for ArcGIS
AUTHOR: Krithica Kantharaj, Esri

ABSTRACT: Insights for ArcGIS is a new user experience for analysis available at ArcGIS 10.5 that focuses on simpler ways to work with your data to answer questions and share results including visualization first, drag and drop analytics and, on the fly filtering and aggregations. Insights for ArcGIS is designed to make interactive and exploratory analysis fast and intuitive so you can gain understanding from your data in a spatial context. Learn techniques in wrangling your data for analysis, best practices in working with Insights and its analysis capabilities and more.

Monday November 6, 2017 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Salon IV

2:30pm

User Session. Feeling Like the NSA: Using GeoEvent Server to Track Mobile Phones and Their People
AUTHORS: Lynn Carlson, Brown University

ABSTRACT: Health professionals often implement geocoding home addresses to gather information related to physical and mental wellness. Addresses are then related to aggregated information about neighborhoods, often defined by census tracts or block groups. If median family income in an individual’s home block group is low, the individual’s median family income may be assumed to be low, and by extension, his/her health more at risk; a home in close proximity to a congested highway, may presume a greater risk for asthma; a home within walking distance to a park, may presume an individual is healthier simply because of access to green space. While helpful, these studies cannot account for variables influencing a person’s health, which change throughout the day as he/she moves outside the home._x000D_
Using GPS-enabled smartphones it becomes possible to expand health studies with individualized measures. While a bit creepy and NSA-like for anyone doing the “watching”, people can be monitored. How long is an individual actually in their home being exposed to polluted air? When is a fast food restaurant being visited that may interfere with weight-loss goals? Are individuals actually going to the accessible park?_x000D_
This presentation focuses on steps needed to implement Esri’s GeoEvent Server with iOS and Android smartphone apps allowing the tracking of individual movements and saving that data for further analysis. Setting up GeoEvent Server to send a text message (“Hi Joe - Please consider a different restaurant”), or take some action (e.g. fill out a survey) will be included.

Monday November 6, 2017 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Salon II

2:30pm

User Session. Five forces catapulting GIS onto the world stage
AUTHORS: Joseph Kerski, Esri

ABSTRACT: Five converging global trends are shaping the advancement of GIS. These trends—geoawareness, geoenablement, geotechnologies, storytelling, and citizen science--represent a window of opportunity to foster and advance geoliteracy throughout education and society. Join Joseph Kerski as we discuss how GIS and spatial thinking at all levels of education is critical to reaching this goal and how you as a GIS professional are key to its success.    Five converging global trends are shaping the advancement of GIS. These trends—geoawareness, geoenablement, geotechnologies, storytelling, and citizen science--represent a window of opportunity to foster and advance geoliteracy throughout education and society. Join Joseph Kerski as we discuss how GIS and spatial thinking at all levels of education is critical to reaching this goal and how you as a GIS professional are key to its success.   

Monday November 6, 2017 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Weatherly

2:30pm

User Session. Preparation for an i-Tree ECO Urban Tree Inventory using GIS
AUTHORS: Peggy Minnis, Senior Lecturer, Pace University

ABSTRACT: An inventory of the urban forest could be the basis for many planning functions in a municipality. Learning the species, age and conditions of the trees can help predict maintenance needs and opportunities for new tree plantings. This project is about planning an inventory for Norwalk, Connecticut, where trained volunteers will collect within a 37.5 foot radius of one to two hundred randomly-distributed points. These data will be entered into the i-Tree tool ECO program. Some of the outputs for ECO analyses are: species condition and distribution, carbon sequestration and storage, pollutant removal, pest risk analysis. GIS is used in the planning and data will be collected on mobile devices using an app specific to this program.

Monday November 6, 2017 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Salon III

2:30pm

User Session. Transportation Asset LifeCycle Management using AGOL and Collector
AUTHORS: Mary Susan Knauss, NYSGISA

ABSTRACT: The NYSDOT will be adopting a new Item number for all construction contracts which will use a digital inventory with a standardized data schema to collect and manage the secondary assets on the NYSDOT maintained roads. The Engineers in Charge and the contractors will use AGOL to share information on the construction status and facilitate tracking completion. The use of the inventory throughout the asset lifecycle, Capital planning, Design and Maintenance Operations will be covered.

Monday November 6, 2017 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Salon I

3:00pm

3:15pm

4:15pm

4:15pm

Poster Session. Are Internal or External Factors Causing Our Schools to Fail
AUTHORS. Luke Davis, Eastern Connecticut State University

ABSTRACT. In 2015, approximately fifty-percent of Hartford Public Schools were identified as underperforming. This trend is a continuation of years prior; thus, a statistical analysis on the Hartford Public School system was completed to determine whether internal or external factors contributed to observed school performance in an attempt to help progress the Hartford Public School system. A multivariable regression analysis evaluated both internal and external factors to predict school performance. Internal factors considered included percent of the students in different ethnic groups, the percent of students who qualify as low income, and percent of classes taught by qualified teachers. External factors considered were the percent of the population in different ethnic groups, percent of crime throughout Hartford, percent of adults who did not to receive a H.S. diploma, and percent of households on financial assistance. Results showed that the ethnic groups of students were statistically significant and had a 43.99% influence in predicting school performance. Evaluation of external factors showed that no variables were statistically significant in predicting school performance yet explained 14.52% of the school performance. Results correspond to previous studies that have shown internal factors are more influential on school performance. This suggests that Hartford should focus on individual schools and the students within them to enhance student's performance. Programs, like Connecticut Coalition for Achievement Now (Conn Can), help the public school systems throughout the state and similar programs could be utilized in cities comparable to Hartford to help increase the performance of public schools throughout the country.

Monday November 6, 2017 4:15pm - 6:15pm
TBA

4:15pm

Poster Session. Automated Report Generation with Python, Model Builder, and Data Driven Pages
AUTHORS. Christopher Dunn, Ramboll Environ

ABSTRACT. Using a combination of the ArcPy module, Model Builder, and Data Driven Pages, we were able to generate a complex series of reports that compared the locations of homes to various spatial layers. The tools use Python to combine spatial and non-spatial data and generate maps and ArcGIS-powered summary reports that supplement site-specific field forms and photologs from site visits. This streamlined process has resulted in us saving hundreds of hours of labor and vastly improved efficiency and drastically reduced the potential for human error.

Monday November 6, 2017 4:15pm - 6:15pm
TBA

4:15pm

Poster Session. Emerald Ash Borer in the City of Poughkeepsie: Mapping an Infestation
AUTHORS. India Futterman, Vassar College; Elise Chessman; Vassar College, Jennifer Rubbo, The Environmental Cooperative at the Vassar Barns; Neil Curri, Vassar College

ABSTRACT. The emerald ash borer (EAB) is an invasive, wood-boring beetle that has the capacity to decimate entire populations of ash trees. Urban tree populations are especially at risk due to their high traffic, by which infested firewood and nursery trees can be transported. The City of Poughkeepsie, NY, has a substantial population of ash trees that are vulnerable to EAB infestation. Symptoms of EAB infestation were observed on ash trees in the outskirts of the City and sporadically throughout City streets. For this reason, the Environmental Cooperative at Vassar Barns has completed an assessment of EAB infestation in the City of Poughkeepsie. Working with data from a 2006 street tree inventory, tree points were plotted in ArcGIS using address geocoding. Tree locations were then ground-truthed and corrected in the field using the ArcGIS Collector app. Tree condition was assessed based on the presence of stress symptoms. Distinct signs of beetle activity, such as d-shaped exit holes and s-shaped galleries, were noted as indicators of EAB. Of 405 street ash trees, 34 (8.4%) demonstrated definitive signs of EAB infestation, while 283 (58.8%) appeared symptomatic for infestation. These results indicate that EAB is established among the City’s street ash trees and the beetle will likely spread to infest all or most of the City’s ash. The Environmental Cooperative plans to utilize this information in the creation of an EAB management plan, including a published version of the tree point map. This document will aid in the City’s future urban forestry maintenance.

Monday November 6, 2017 4:15pm - 6:15pm
TBA

4:15pm

Poster Session. Land Cover Change and Forest Loss in the Woonasquatucket Watershed in Northern Rhode Island
AUTHORS. Kaitlynn Howard and John Stachelhaus ?" Bryant University, Smithfield , RI

ABSTRACT. Land Cover Change and Forest Loss in the Woonasquatucket Watershed in Northern Rhode Island Kaitlynn Howard and John Stachelhaus ?" Bryant University, Smithfield , RI Land Use/Cover data from the RIGIS database from 2003 and 2011 was used to determine and show changes in land cover within the northern section of the Woonasquatucket watershed resulting in a loss of forest cover. The loss was mainly the result of an increase in developed land. ARCGIS desktop was used to aggregate similar attributes in the 36 code MacConell modified Anderson Level 3 RIGIS land use data to create Level 1 land cover, 7 feature code attributes for the 2003 and 2011 data sets. The two resulting polygon feature classes were "dissolved", new polygon area attributes were calculated and the results were statistically analyzed for land cover changes over the 8 year period. A statistical loss of 630 acres or approximately one square mile of forest cover for the 25 square mile area studied was shown. Most of the changes were the result of development in smaller polygons making these changes difficult to see in an overall graphic representation. Not surprising in a relatively densely developing urban environment such as Rhode Island, the resulting loss of forest cover was due mainly to a gain in developed land. A rough estimate of loss of carbon sequestration due to forest loss was determined to access possible local impact on climate change.

Monday November 6, 2017 4:15pm - 6:15pm
TBA

4:15pm

Poster Session. New Jersey Land Use + Transit Data Application – Developing and Online Planning Tool Using ArcGIS
AUTHORS. Lucas Marxen, Rutgers NJAES Office of Research Analytics; Jon Carnegie, Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center; Daniel Farnsworth, Rutgers NJAES Office of Research Analytics

ABSTRACT. Transit-oriented development is a popular concept around rail and light rail systems.  In 2016, New Jersey Transit and the North Jersey Transportation Planning Authority partnered with the Rutgers Voorhees Transportation Center to research the development that has occurred around the Hudson Bergen Light Rail (HBLR) system in Northeast New Jersey.  The HBLR is a relatively new light rail system in a highly urbanized part of the state, making it ideal for analyzing the change in development patterns around the system.  As part of this project, the Rutgers Office of Research Analytics was contracted to develop a web-mapping tool to explore the data collected around the HBLR system and to serve as a platform for expanding the work to other rail lines in New Jersey.  Given the GIS-focused nature of the two state agencies involved, it was determined that an ArcGIS-based approach to the system would be ideal.  ArcGIS Server and ArcGIS for JavaScript were utilized with other tools to create the NJ Land Use and Transit Data Application (http://njlutrans.org).  The resulting tool allow users to explore development, travel/transit, demographic, and other relevant datasets spatially through the mapping interface.  It also allows users to create custom geographic selections and generate custom reports and data downloads for those selections.  This poster will present the resulting application, how it was constructed, and some of the challenges that were faced in its development.

Monday November 6, 2017 4:15pm - 6:15pm
TBA

4:15pm

Poster Session. Providence Water Watershed and System Map
AUTHORS. Jay Metzger, Karen Jordan, Jonathan Hernandez, and Kristin Meseck - Providence Water

ABSTRACT. This eleven foot by seven foot map was created, over the course of two years, through the collaborative efforts of the Records Department at Providence Water, to show the breadth and reach of Providence Water's watershed and distribution system. This map also incorporates an info-graphic of the process, from the intake of surface water from the Scituate Reservoir to the delivery of clean water to the public. The map will be an installation in the new Providence Water Historical Museum, located on Dupont Drive, in Providence, Rhode Island.

Monday November 6, 2017 4:15pm - 6:15pm
TBA

4:15pm

Poster Session. Status and Trends of Narragansett Bay and its Watershed: A Geographical Approach
AUTHORS. Eivy Y. Monroy, Narragansett Bay Estuary Program; Anne Kuhn, US EPA Atlantic Ecology Division; Mike A. Charpentier, CSRA; Jessica Cressman, Environmental Data Center URI; Juliet Swigor, MassDEP; Julia Twichell, Narragansett Bay Estuary Program;

ABSTRACT. Status and trends for stressor and condition indicators of Narragansett Bay and its watershed will be presented including results from dasymetric models, heat maps, and analyses at varying spatial scales. A bi-state effort was crucial to the development of this report.

Monday November 6, 2017 4:15pm - 6:15pm
TBA

4:15pm

Poster Session. To Catch a Criminal: Cannabis Edition - Remote Sensing Techniques for Identifying Illegal 'Trespass Grow' Operations in California's Conservation Lands, 2014
AUTHORS. Carolyn Talmadge, Tufts University

ABSTRACT. California has been at the forefront of marijuana legislation and cultivation since the 1970s. In November 2016, residents voted to make California the fifth state to legalize recreational marijuana for adults 21 and older. In fact, cannabis cultivation has been so successful in the golden state, almost two-thirds of the country's total legal harvest is cultivated there (Smith, 2017). However, even as California embraces the booming marijuana market and more of the crop is grown legally, the state has seen a surge in illegal cultivation. These growing operations, known as" trespass grows", often take place in the remote stretches of public lands. In fact, as much as 80% of illegal cannabis eradicated in California is grown on federal lands and this is just the fraction that has been discovered (Smith, 2017). As marijuana, legalization moves forwards, these trespass grows present a host of environmental, health and safety concerns. These include deforesting conservation lands, using lethal doses of pesticides, rodenticides and fertilizers which are killing wildlife, destroying ecosystems and leaching into waterways, in addition to using large amounts of water which is depleting California's already scare water supply . The nature of the trespass grow operations presents a unique spatial problem that could be examined using remotely sensed techniques and data. The goal of this project is two fold: 1) determine which unsupervised classifications technique best identifies known marijuana grow operations throughout Humboldt County and 2) identify potential trespass grow locations that are "highly suspect" and require further investigation.

Monday November 6, 2017 4:15pm - 6:15pm
TBA

4:15pm

Poster Session. Using ArcGIS mobile apps for data collection: successes and challenges
AUTHORS. Neil Curri, PVE, LLC and Vassar College

ABSTRACT. ArcGIS mobile apps (Collector, Survey 123) have been used for a various field data collection projects at Vassar College, including an inventory of the college's arboretum tree collection, inspecting and monitoring stormwater infrastructure, managing horticultural planting beds, and collecting bird observations at the Vassar Farm & Ecological Preserve. ESRI's ArcGIS Online platform and integrated mobile apps enables us to configure them for field collection missions and create maps with the collected data relatively quickly, but the software and hardware sometimes impose limitations on what would be an ideal workflow and/or representation of the data. This poster outlines the successes and challenges imposed by those limitations, and how we worked through them.

Monday November 6, 2017 4:15pm - 6:15pm
TBA

6:30pm

8:30pm

Entertainment: Live Music by Zink Alloy at Parlor Bar & Kitchen
After dining in Newport, come on down and rock with us! Zinc Alloy will get you moving with their rock, blues, and classic dance music.

The Parlor Bar is located at 200 Broadway, less than a mile from the Newport Marriott Hotel.

Monday November 6, 2017 8:30pm - 11:30pm
Offsite: Parlor Bar 200 Broadway, Newport, RI 02840
 
Tuesday, November 7
 

7:30am

7:30am

Vendor Area Open
Tuesday November 7, 2017 7:30am - 1:30pm
TBA

7:30am

9:00am

KEYNOTE ADDRESS by Malcolm Spaulding - 'STORMTOOLS a GIS Based System to Provide Web Accessible Flooding Maps for Coastal and Inland Communities.'
STORMTOOLS a GIS Based System to Provide Web Accessible Flooding Maps for Coastal and Inland Communities.

The vision for STORMTOOLS is to provide access a suite of coastal planning tools (numerical models, etc.), available as a GIS based web service, that allows wide spread accessibly and applicability at high resolution for user selected coastal or inland areas of interest. The first tool (2015) developed under this framework was a flood inundation model that allowed estimates of flooding, with and without sea level rise(SLR), for varying return periods. Inundation estimates can be based on the  US Army Corps of Engineers numerical hydrodynamic/wave model predictions performed as part of the North Atlantic Coast Comprehensive Study (NACCS) for the area impacted by Hurricane Sandy, including all of the northeast, or other similar flood modelling studies for the area of interest.  To address challenges facing coastal zone managers and municipal planners in the development of an objective, quantitative assessment of the risk to structures, infrastructure, and public safety a Coastal Environmental Risk Index(CERI) was developed next. CERI allows estimates of inundation, wave, and wind damage at a structure by structure level and has been designed as a web accessible Geographic Information System (GIS) based tool. CERI can be applied to both coastal and inland areas. CERI has been applied to several communities representing typical coastal barrier systems directly exposed to ocean waves and high erosion rates, with predominantly low density single family residences and to areas inside a bay with more limited wave exposure, lower erosion rates, and higher residential housing density. STORMTOOLS Design Elevation Maps(SDEs) are currently being generated to support coastal planning and design and explicitly consider SLR. All GIS products developed as part of this initiative have been made available via GIS. One of the additional benefits of SDE maps is that one obtains flooding maps similar to those provided by FEMA Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM) but that explicitly consider sea level rise.  In addition 3D visualization of the results have been used to help better communicate the results to the planning community and the public.

Keynote Speakers
avatar for Malcolm Spaulding

Malcolm Spaulding

Professor Emeritus, Ocean Engineering, University of Rhode Island
Dr. Malcolm L. Spaulding is Professor Emeritus, Ocean Engineering at the University of Rhode Island (URI) and Principal, Spaulding Environmental Associates (SEA), LLC. He served for 40 yrs on the faculty and over a decade as department chair. He was the Founder and first Director, University of Rhode... Read More →


Tuesday November 7, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am
TBA

10:00am

Refreshment Break with Vendors
Tuesday November 7, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
TBA

10:30am

Esri Technical Session. Introducing ArcGIS Enterprise
AUTHOR: Adam Ziegler, Esri

ABSTRACT: ArcGIS Enterprise is the next evolution of the ArcGIS for Server product line. ArcGIS Enterprise includes all of the components that you're familiar with like Portal for ArcGIS, ArcGIS Server, and more. Get an introduction to ArcGIS Enterprise: what the rebranding means, the base deployment, and additional capabilities available through new server roles.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Salon IV

10:30am

User Session. 3D Visualizations
AUTHORS: Katie Grillo*, City of Cambridge, MA

ABSTRACT: Cambridge GIS has been experimenting with and developing a citywide 3D model which extends the City’s GIS infrastructure with three dimensional data. While 2D GIS data is extremely valuable in mapping city-wide resources, features, and points of interest, the 3D expansion allows for new types of visualizations and analysis that were not previously available to internal City staff and the public.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Salon I

10:30am

User Session. ArcGIS Collector in support of AEC Workflows
AUTHORS: Ian Sleeper, Terracon Consultants

ABSTRACT: ArcGIS Collector helps to address a critical need for configurable field data collection tools in support of AEC project workflows. By incorporating ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Collector at the early stages of a project we can introduce greater collaboration and efficiency across the project team. Early involvement also helps us gain control over unwieldy project workflows that would otherwise require significant effort back in the office to help manage and report findings from the field. This presentation will use several case studies, ranging from facility asset management to helicopter survey of pipeline right-of-ways, to demonstrate lessons learned from implementation of ArcGIS Collector in support of a variety of AEC project workflows in a large organization. We will also discuss ways to streamline common data collection workflows in Collector using ArcGIS Online resources and custom templates.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Salon III

10:30am

User Session. GeoAnalytics for Protecting Property and Saving Lives
AUTHORS: Kate Hickey, GISP, PMP, Vice President, Consulting Services, AppGeo

ABSTRACT: AppGeo collaborated with a national fire safety organization to develop web-based tools for data visualization and analysis. By studying nationwide incidents, injuries and deaths in the context of demographic and other contextual data, the organization can better understand why and how incidents occur. What factors contribute to incidents? Why are certain geographic regions hard hit than others? How effective are fire prevention initiatives? This presentation will explore these questions and demonstrate how data analytics platforms can be life saving tool.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Weatherly

10:30am

User Session. Identifying Vulnerability and Modeling Resilience in a Complex Transportation Network: A Web App for Vermont
AUTHORS: Alan Hammersmith*, Stone Environmental

ABSTRACT: This web GIS application is a collaborative effort of environmental scientists, data modelers, GIS application developers and web designers. The application allows stakeholders to visualize the resilience of Vermont's transportation network related to a multitude of environmental factors. These factors help determine each asset's potential for failure, and how that failure impacts the rest of the system. As part of the study, a subset of data was used from 3 of the watersheds that were among the hardest hit during Hurricane Irene.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Salon II

10:30am

User Session. Mapping Stone Walls and Relict Land Use Features with LIDAR Data
AUTHORS: William B. Ouimet*, Department of Geography and Center for Integrative Geosciences, University of Connecticut; Katharine M. Johnson, Department of Geography and Center for Integrative Geosciences, University of Connecticut, and Earth Resources Technology, Inc., NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, Asheville, NC

ABSTRACT: High-resolution, publicly available airborne LiDAR data for southern New England has transformed the ability to identify and map fine scale topographic features related to past human activity, particularly those which lie abandoned and covered by modern forests.The most well-known and widespread example of these features seen in LIDAR data are stone walls, which indicate areas used for 17th to early 20th century agriculture and pasture. Another widespread but less well-known feature type that can be detected by LiDAR is relict charcoal hearths, which were primarily used in the 19th century for charcoal production associated with iron furnaces. Additional features seen in LIDAR include old roads, trails, dams and drainage ditches. This presentation will outline and discuss the steps and techniques involved with mapping these historic era features with LiDAR data, including: downloading and working with LiDAR data; employing DEM visualization techniques; and, identifying and digitizing features. In addition to creating, analyzing and publishing maps of stone walls (Johnson and Ouimet, 2016), we have recently been applying this approach in undergraduate GIS courses and plan to develop a workshop with similar aims. LiDAR is available for the entire extents of CT, RI, MA and parts of NY, VT, and NH, but to date historic features have only been mapped in isolated portions. Datasets of historic features created through this approach will aid preservation and conservation efforts by enabling scientists, archaeologists, and concerned groups to locate, research, catalogue and demarcate the features, as well as their material sources and impact.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Freedom

10:30am

CONCURRENT USER SESSIONS
Tuesday November 7, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
TBA

10:30am

11:00am

Esri Technical Session. ArcGIS Enterprise Architecture and Deployment
AUTHOR: Adam Ziegler, Esri

ABSTRACT: Architecting your ArcGIS Enterprise deployment doesn't have to be difficult. This session will cover the fundamentals of architecting the base ArcGIS Enterprise deployment and will lead you through more complex deployment scenarios that include the new capability based ArcGIS Server roles.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 11:00am - 11:30am
Salon IV

11:00am

User Session. Municipal Sewer Manhole Inspections Using Collector: Anyone Can Do It
AUTHORS: Carol P. Baker, Town of South Kingston, RI

ABSTRACT: Four years ago, the Town of South Kingstown worked with a contractor to develop a mobile app for stormwater infrastructure field inspections on an iPad, using iOs as a programming language. Fast forward 4 years later, Esri's Collector app for ArcGIS Online allows for any GIS practitioner to develop the same easily without any programming know how. The Town has developed a mobile app using ArcGIS Online and Collector to use track maintenance and inspection actions for the Town's sewer manholes. Presentation will review processes needed to develop data, create a map service, and create a webmap. No programming experience necessary!

Tuesday November 7, 2017 11:00am - 11:30am
Salon III

11:00am

User Session. Technology Trend: Using Geo-spatial Business Analytics to Visualize Performance
AUTHORS: Darren Mackiewicz, Jayson Brennen – CDM Smith

ABSTRACT: In today’s technology-driven world, utility professionals are increasingly looking for tools that will help streamline the ways in which data can be collected, disseminated, and analyzed. In fact, we live in a society in which instant access to information is critical (preferably using the phone in your pocket), and using information and analytics to make more informed decisions is not a luxury - it’s a necessity. _x000D_
There are a rapidly increasing number of technology tools that can be used to support more informed decision making and performance measurement. Software tools like Esri Insights allow utilities to integrate data from multiple datasets and bring that information together into a single, visual dashboard environment that can greatly help identify trends (i.e. where water main breaks are occurring), track progress towards goals (i.e. status of a sewer system inspection program), and visualize data in real-time (i.e. energy consumption in pump stations). These tools, coupled with mobile GIS data collection and analysis tools, can prove to be valuable solutions that support more effective asset management, system operations, and performance tracking. _x000D_
During this presentation, case studies detailing the use of GIS-based business analytics dashboards for utility asset management will be presented and examples will be provided. In addition, the pros and cons of popular hardware and software solutions will be discussed. Utilities large and small can benefit from the proper use of technology and this presentation will provide a concise overview of key emerging solutions.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 11:00am - 11:30am
Salon II

11:00am

User Session. The Use of GIS in Advancing Resilient Municipal Planning
AUTHORS: Isabel Kaubisch*, Clarendon Hill Consulting

ABSTRACT: Municipalities are facing increased risks of flooding due to climate change. Adapting neighborhoods and infrastructure to the risks of flooding and sea level rise in the best ways possible will shape future municipal work and sets the framework for this presentation. _x000D_
This presentation will explore how GIS based risk and vulnerability assessments can be used to assess the local municipal situation and to develop solutions best-aligned with the community’s needs. Examples will draw from our recent work with the City of Fairhaven, Massachusetts which has undergone the process of developing a new hazard mitigation plan. We will highlight examples from our GIS based risk and vulnerability assessments which identified flood risks and sea level rise as the most critical issues. In closing, we will give examples for flood protection and stormwater design measures.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 11:00am - 11:30am
Salon I

11:00am

User Session. Tricky Photogrammetry
AUTHORS: Jason Wise, Terracon

ABSTRACT: If you just want to turn drone photos into a topographic map, your software will pretty much do it for you. But what if you need to model a building with sharp corners? How about a structure made of trusses, or objects that are only partially visible? Can you mix photos taken at different times with different cameras, perhaps on the ground and in the air? With a little creativity, you can combine old-school photogrammetric techniques, modern software, and imported data to get an accurate model from your photos.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 11:00am - 11:30am
Freedom

11:00am

User Session. USing GIS as a Solar Energy Development Tool
AUTHORS: Richard O’Gara, Senior Geospatial Analyst, PEER Consultants, pc

ABSTRACT: Photovoltaic (PV) electric systems are being installed at a high rate in the United States (U.S.). In fact, 14 GigaWatts (GW) of PV systems were installed in the U.S. in 2016 alone, which is 95% greater than the 2015 total, and the highest amount ever installed in a year in the U.S.. There are now 45 GW of PV capacity installed at 1.4 million sites around the U.S., as of Q1, 2017 (1) _x000D_
There are many sites in the U.S. being currently considered for solar energy generation facilities, and different types of solar energy project work is available to consultants to work on those sites. All the work has spatial questions that must be addressed during the bidding, planning, installation, and maintenance phases of solar power generation projects._x000D_
This presentation will explore the ways GIS has been used to assist with PV solar energy analysis and development projects._x000D_
(1) Solar Energy Industries Association Website, http://www.seia.org/research-resources/solar-industry-data_x000D_

Tuesday November 7, 2017 11:00am - 11:30am
Weatherly

11:30am

Esri Technical Session. ArcGIS GeoEvent Server: Real Time GIS
AUTHOR: Adam Ziegler, Esri

ABSTRACT: ArcGIS GeoEvent Server expands the capabilities of ArcGIS Enterprise enabling organizations to connect with virtually any type of streaming data and automatically alert personnel when specified conditions occur, all in real-time. This session will introduce how you can incorporate real-time information streams with your existing GIS data and IT infrastructure, perform continuous processing and analytics against streaming data, and produce new streams of data that work seamlessly with the rest of the ArcGIS products including ArcGIS Online and Portal for ArcGIS.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Salon IV

11:30am

User Session. A Look Inside an Enterprise GIS for Insurance
AUTHORS: Jason Catelli*, FM Global

ABSTRACT: As a global commercial and industrial property insurer, we deal with geospatial data in many shapes and sizes from across the world. By leveraging multiple software platforms and services we can get valuable information in the hands of our client-service teams so they can assess the exposure at a client’s facility. This talk will touch upon some of the processes, workflows, data integration and analysis that make our GIS tick.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Salon II

11:30am

User Session. Applications and Limitations of LiDAR for Cultural Resource Managers in the Northeast
AUTHORS: Jane Miller*, Public Archaeology Laboratory; Joseph (Jay) N. Waller, Jr., Public Archaeology Laboratory

ABSTRACT: Staff at Rhode Island’s Public Archaeology Laboratory (PAL) have been using LiDAR for several years to find, identify, and interpret cultural resources throughout the Northeast. PAL’s mission - helping clients comply with historic preservation law by considering how project construction may impact historic or archaeological properties - requires its cultural resource management staff to identify previously unknown or lost historic resources. LiDAR’s unique ability to penetrate forest cover lends itself well to the Northeast landscape and its distribution in a variety of user-friendly digital formats enables non-technical staff access to a landscape they can “survey” remotely from their office workstation. This presentation discusses some of the limitations of LiDAR for cultural resource management applications and highlights a few projects throughout the Northeast where LiDAR was particularly useful for research, desktop analysis, field survey, and interpretation.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Freedom

11:30am

User Session. Mapping's Importance to Managing Stormwater in CT
AUTHORS: David Dickson, UConn Center for Land Use Education and Research (CLEAR), Cary Chadwick, UConn CLEAR; Amanda Ryan, UConn CLEAR; Emily Wilson, UConn CLEAR

ABSTRACT: Connecticut communities are facing significant changes to the way they are required to manage stormwater runoff. From mapping the municipal storm drainage system to calculating & tracking the percentage of directly connected impervious area, a good portion of these changes require the use of mapping. While some of these requirements are straightforward others will require new techniques and strategies. The regulations demonstrate how regulators are increasing rely on mapping to help direct and focus the activities of those they regulate. The UConn Center for Land Use Education and Research is working with communities to help them identify strategies for meeting these requirements efficiently and cost effectively. This session will highlight the new requirements, the challenges they pose to communities or varying sizes and capacities, and some of the strategies CLEAR has identified to help communities meet the new requirements.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Salon I

11:30am

User Session. Using AGOL to Manage Beehives in CT
AUTHORS: Jason Courter, GISP, New England Geosystems

ABSTRACT: While reading about the sudden peril of bees and what environmental effects could be causing their demise, I became interested in beekeeping and purchased/built two hives of my own. After hearing about how Connecticut only had one official beekeeper, I reached out to see if GIS could possibly help out with such a small staff. The beekeeper needed to track the location of the registered hives and when they were last inspected. In case a hive was found to have diseases or other problems, the GIS could help to find and notify other hive owners nearby. The talk will discuss what data needs to be collected in the field and why the info is needed. The app created is fairly simple and uses AGOL to provide the mapping services needed whether from work station or mobile devices.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Weatherly

11:30am

User Session. Using ArcGIS Collector, SDE and ArcGIS OnLine to do Blight Inspections in the City of Hartford, CT
AUTHORS: Randi Pickford*, City of Hartford

ABSTRACT: The City of Hartford has been using mobile technology to conduct blight inspections in the field and to collect data. This talk will cover a 3 year evolution of the Blight Inspection program and how GIS helps support their work. Starting with data collection in the field on a tablet, uploading the data into the City's Enterprise GIS data, the data is displayed and edited in an ArcGIS online website. Finally, an analysis of the data is done to determine where to focus efforts and the mapping is shared with the community through ArcGIS Online to engage civic involvement.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Salon III

12:00pm

1:30pm

Vendor Area Closes
Tuesday November 7, 2017 1:30pm - 1:30pm
TBA

1:30pm

Esri Technical Session. Configuring ArcGIS Online for Open Data
AUTHOR: Tom Schwartzman, Esri

ABSTRACT: ArcGIS Online for Open Data helps you to connecting citizens and businesses to your authoritative data. See how to set up a public-facing website within minutes to share your open data. ArcGIS Open Data is an Esri hosted and managed solution that is included with ArcGIS Online. Time permitting you will see examples of taking open data even further by giving it purpose and context with ArcGIS Hub.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Salon IV

1:30pm

User Session. Facilities Information Systems as a Campus Planning Tool
AUTHORS: Pamela Locke, GISP, University of Massachusetts Lowell; Sara Cassidy Smith, AIA, University of Massachusetts Lowell

ABSTRACT: The body of data collected and mapped by the University of Massachusetts, Lowell’s Facilities information System (FIS) team includes interior and exterior data used for many different reasons. A good portion of this data is used by the University’s Planning Department during all stages of a project. We can check classroom schedules and usage, view spaces allocated to academic departments, and see which types of spaces exist in campus buildings (offices, classrooms and labs, for example). We can also view photographs, 360-degree photographs, and information such as number of outlets, or types of media available in all instructional spaces and labs across campus. This data is verified and updated annually, and provides quantitative information for campus planners and administrators in a format they can easily use. The presenters will demonstrate capabilities of the UML GIS database, how the information is collected and used as an analytical tool for existing occupancy (who is where, who has enough space, who may need more), desired academic adjacencies, and future space needs. For example: • Using building floor plans classified by department, planners can compare occupancy with growth projections to predict shortfalls in faculty offices or departments with space to spare. • Mapping student spaces onto a campus plan, planners can analyze why certain locations are successful and where more might be best located _x000D_
This presentation will cover data collection techniques (focusing on interior data collection) and follow the data through the campus planning process.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Freedom

1:30pm

User Session. Hazardous Facility Site Assessments Using Survey123
AUTHORS: Tim Liponis*, US EPA

ABSTRACT: ASRC Federal Vistronix, in contract with EPA Region 1, has developed a mobile field application for the use of hazardous facility site assessments using Survey123. The goal of the project was to create a digital workflow for the site assessments in place of traditional survey methods. Key points of the project included the following: 1. adaptation of the checklist to a tablet-friendly electronic version to use and populate in the field. Fields would be pre-populated according to existing prior data; 2. Ability to capture GPS location of the facility and any corresponding features within the facility; 3. Capability to capture geo-tagged photographs for each site. The mobile application workflow also detailed an interactive map with functionality to integrate the associated field data with external sources and make available site assessment reports.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Salon III

1:30pm

User Session. Incorporating GIS in Your Daily Workflow Throughout Your Public Asset Management System
AUTHORS: Josh Stroessner*, Cityworks

ABSTRACT: GIS is the perfect platform for local governments to design and create an integrated GIS-centric public asset management system using spatial relationships as a way to manage, coordinate, and analyze all public assets and work activities. GIS plays a vital role in asset inventory, providing the "Where it is" and "What it is" for your assets.  Often the GIS data is not used in the daily operations of asset and work but mostly for making maps and visualizing infrastructure. This presentation will provide examples and the benefits of incorporating GIS into daily operations and will offer steps to accomplish this in your organization.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Salon II

1:30pm

User Session. The 3D Elevation Program (3DEP)
AUTHORS: Dan Walters, US Geological Survey

ABSTRACT: The primary goal of 3DEP is to systematically collect enhanced elevation data in the form of high-quality light detection and ranging (lidar) data over the conterminous United States, Hawaii, and the U.S. territories over an 8-year period. USGS Broad Agency Announcements established a competitive solicitation procedure for partnering with federal agencies for lidar acquisition. So far 3DEP has received considerable support from federal, state, local, nonprofit and private organizations providing funds in partnership to collect lidar and provide high-quality elevation products. The presentation will describe the program, review the status of 3DEP in the northeast, provide an overview of the tools to discover and access the data and close with a discussion of upcoming 3DEP activities that will benefit the region.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Weatherly

1:30pm

CONCURRENT USER SESSIONS
Tuesday November 7, 2017 1:30pm - 3:00pm
TBA

1:30pm

Panel. Statewide Parcel Data? How Northeastern States Are Getting There
AUTHORS: Leslie Pelch, VT Center for Geographic Information; Michele Giorgianni, Applied Geographics, Inc.

ABSTRACT: Each state in our region has approached the goal of statewide parcel data in a different way. This panel will present several examples (Vermont, Rhode Island, and a few more) and invite the audience to engage in conversation about how best to compile and distribute this essential and foundational data layer.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Salon I

2:00pm

Esri Technical Session. ArcGIS Online Public Initiatives Pages
AUTHOR: Tom Schwartzman, Esri

ABSTRACT: See how to leverage your investment in ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Open Data to create citizen oriented content that mirrors your organization's top priorities and initiatives.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Salon IV

2:00pm

User Session. ArcGIS Online and Custom Applications: WaterTraq and Main Break Mapping
AUTHORS: James Touchet*, Tyrand Fuller* – Suffolk County Water Authority

ABSTRACT: For decades, researchers, scientists, regulators, health departments, environmental laboratories and water suppliers have collected and analyzed water quality data from thousands of monitoring and public supply wells throughout Long Island. Millions of individual water quality test results have been managed and stored independently in databases of those same entities but never unified into one system. Combining the benefits of MS Excel spreadsheets and ArcGIS-Online web templates have now made the seemingly-impossible a reality: the creation of ArcGIS Online-based “WaterTraq”, a comprehensive visualization and analytical water quality application._x000D_
“WaterTraq” now allows these same entities and the public a simple method to search for any sampled analyte, including concentration and range and display the results visually. Water quality data can now be displayed both in spatial dimensions and time; it offers an unprecedented view into the Long Island, NY aquifer system. _x000D_
Nationwide, the replacement of failing water mains is considered a priority for water utilities. Main breaks can plague aging public water supply infrastructure; it’s critical to note the location of each incident and include key attributes. Configured ArcGIS Online-based web maps and Collector are invaluable tools for efficiently mapping these emergency situations and identifying potential break “clusters”; such applications can instantly support asset management and often supersede paper-based, work order-driven processes. Customer Service Technicians have transitioned from an ArcReader-based, multi step reporting process to a single, intuitive interface. Using Collector, repair status and outage estimates are communicated real-time and efficiently, with no paper!

Tuesday November 7, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Salon II

2:00pm

User Session. Implementing Space Management & Move Management at the City of Philadelphia
AUTHORS: Stu Rich,* PenBay Solutions

ABSTRACT: Philadelphia, the City of Brotherly Love, is one of the most iconic cities on the eastern seaboard. It takes thousands of employess to make the City run. Managing the space portfolio for those employees, the assignment of employees and departments to spaces, and supporting moves of people singly and in large groups requires thoughtful business processes and modern software. Building upon the City's Enterprise GIS and IWAMS systems, the City has implemented a new Space & Move Management System. The system integrates information from CAD floor plans, the City's Enterprise GIS, and their HR system. The resulting system greatly improves the efficiency of the space management processes at the City and provides visibility into space & occupancy metrics for the first time in the City's history.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Freedom

2:00pm

User Session. Stop Calling It GIS
AUTHORS: Jamie Gaynor, Terracon Consultants, Inc.

ABSTRACT: As the GIS industry matures, the definition of GIS starts to take on different meanings from various organizational perspectives. These perspectives can introduce barriers when developing and implementing a GIS strategy for the organization. By shifting to a technology implementation strategy built around the common theme of spatial data, managers are able build the consensus and alignment necessary to produce meaningful change in an organization. This presentation will use practical examples from the AEC industry to demonstrate common challenges and approaches to implementing an effective GIS strategy for your organization.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Weatherly

2:00pm

User Session. Techniques for Leveraging Survey123 and ArcGIS Online as a Mobile Data Collection Platform
AUTHORS: Larry Spraker, VHB

ABSTRACT: Survey123 is a powerful, form‐centric, mobile data-collection application that is completely integrated with ArcGIS Online. This presentation will review a variety of techniques for leveraging Survey123 as a form-centric data collection application in the field, as well as several system concepts and strategies for accessing, reviewing, and processing the survey data using Web App Builder and ArcGIS Online in the back office.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Salon III

2:30pm

Esri Technical Session. Citizen Engagement with ArcGIS Crowdsourcing Solutions
AUTHOR: Krithica Kantharaj, Esri

ABSTRACT: GIS could be a part of your organization’s citizen engagement strategy to enable transparency and accountability in government processes, allow better performance measurement and place-based approaches to governance. The ArcGIS platform allows citizens to report incidents or observations directly to the public official and to actively participate in government on their terms. This session introduces the crowdsourcing solutions available in the ArcGIS platform to help you collaborate with the public.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Salon IV

2:30pm

User Session. 911 System Database Improvement at the Mohegan Tribe
AUTHORS: Steven R. Marien, LS, CfedS – Geographic Information Officer; Andrew Bowne, GISP – GIS Administrator

ABSTRACT: The Mohegan Tribal Government regulates, manages and disseminates spatial information for theMohegan Tribe’s lands and facilities using AutoCAD and ESRI ArcGIS software. The Tribe is in theprocess of utilizing GIS technology to validate, update and manage location data for the 8000+employees spread across 11,000,000 square feet in this very dynamic environment. This session willprovide an overview of how we are developing and managing employee attribute and location data inGIS necessary to support the National 911 database and other important business processes for ourorganization.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Freedom

2:30pm

User Session. Diving into the Web Application Builder Development Framework for Building Production Applications
AUTHORS: Sam Berg*, VHB

ABSTRACT: If ArcGIS API for JavaScript is the best way to build web applications that utilize web-based data powered by ArcGIS, then the Web Application Builder Developer Edition is a core framework to have in the web developer's toolbox. Even though a widget based framework has been around for years (ie. Esri's Flex and Silverlight Builder environments), the real fun (in the presenter's opinion) comes when extending the core of the WAB framework. Come join Sam Berg as he describes (at a reasonably high level suitable for both developers and fans of custom development) a few of the core areas where VHB has extended the WAB framework for production web applications for their clients.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Salon II

2:30pm

User Session. Survey123 for UAS Flight Management and Planning
AUTHORS: Nate Ward,* Terracon

ABSTRACT: Operational planning and standardized procedures are necessary for organizations to safely and efficiently deploy unmanned aerial systems (UAS) in support of projects. Survey123 provides a simple and versatile solution to help address these needs for UAS flight management and planning. This presentation will outline the critical information involved with UAS operation planning, the process of configuring Survey123 to record this information, and project outcomes from several case studies within a large consulting engineering firm.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Salon III

2:30pm

User Session. Why using the correct POI data can enhance and strengthen your GIS database
AUTHORS: Bill Loges, Sr. Director, Infogroup

ABSTRACT: This would be a co-presentation with the CT State Police on POI(Point of Interest) data. Our presentation will focus on using “points of interest” data in infrastructure, emergency planning and GIS and the overall positive impact. The uses of POI data, planners, and GIS is to assign a dollar value to a project with a visual representation. How using POI data is used in:Economic Development; 911; Emergency Management; ITS / Infrastructure; Planning; Transportation

Tuesday November 7, 2017 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Weatherly

3:00pm

Refreshment Break
Tuesday November 7, 2017 3:00pm - 3:30pm
TBA

3:30pm

LIGHTNING TALKS
Tuesday November 7, 2017 3:30pm - 5:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

Lightning Session. #Leancoffee
AUTHORS. Jamie Gaynor, Terracon Consultants, Inc.

ABSTRACT. Stop complaining about meetings and make them more effective using a light-weight, structured, agenda-less approach.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 3:30pm - 5:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

Lightning Session. Best Management Practices
AUTHORS. Heather Nunn, Langan Engineering

ABSTRACT. Good data is the foundation of any map or mapping application. There are a few best management practices that are easy to implement and make working on a project more efficient and produce successful outcomes. _x000D_
Doing things the quickest way is not always the best way. It is important to think about the project long term. Spending a few more minutes setting files up can save a lot of time in the future. _x000D_
When working on a project think about yourself revisiting the project a year later, about someone else taking over the project, potential changes and revisions that may be requested, and future needs of the project. _x000D_
This presentation will cover a few tips and tricks for file naming conventions, documenting sources and changes, and querying data. Although data and best management practices are not the most exciting topic, they are the building blocks to any successful project and are important to keep in mind as a GIS professional.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 3:30pm - 5:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

Lightning Session. Global Flood Map
AUTHORS. Jason Catelli*, FM Global

ABSTRACT. FM Global’s new Global Flood Map is a revolution in flood mapping technology. It’s a physically based map that provides a worldwide view of moderate- and high-hazard flood zones across the globe. Unlike maps based solely on historical flood data, the Global Flood Map is built using hydrology and hydraulic science, and considers, among other factors, essential information like rainfall, evaporation, snowmelt and terrain.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 3:30pm - 5:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

Lightning Session. Tufts GIS Expo Explorer
AUTHORS. Patrick Florance, Tufts University; Carolyn Talmadge*, Tufts University

ABSTRACT. Tufts GIS Expo Explorer is an open source pedagogical tool that provides access to over 1200 student GIS research projects at Tufts University. The Expo Explorer provides students, faculty, and administrators search, discovery, visualization, and analytics of past and current geospatial research across the university. The interactive web application explores various aspects of Tufts GIS research via subject content including geographic extent, topics, and methods, in addition to courses, academic departments and schools.http://sites.tufts.edu/gis/expoexplorer

Tuesday November 7, 2017 3:30pm - 5:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

Lightning Session. Understanding the Geospatial Data Act of 2017
AUTHORS. Sarah Hoskins, GIS and Data Librarian, Wellesley College Library & Technology Services

ABSTRACT. The Geospatial Data Act of 2017, alongside state level legislation and other Federal legislation like the Local Zoning Decisions Protection act, can potentially change the way GIS practitioners in all disciplines operate. This lightning talk will try to address why geospatial data is such a concern to lawmakers, the theoretical implications of such acts and the practical ramifications. The Geospatial Data Act limits all federally contracted geospatial work, including data collection and imagery, to a narrow set of licensed firms, excluding others from the market. The Local Zoning Decisions Protection Act takes these restrictions even further, claiming that “no Federal funds may be used to design, build, maintain, utilize, or provide access to a Federal database of geospatial information on community racial disparities or disparities in access to affordable housing.” Professional organizations including the American Association of Geographers have come out strongly against the bills. It is important for GIS professionals in industry, government and academia to understand how Geospatial Data Act could potentially effect their work and how to respond. 

Tuesday November 7, 2017 3:30pm - 5:00pm
TBA

5:00pm

5:30pm

Networking Social
Tuesday November 7, 2017 5:30pm - 6:30pm
TBA

6:30pm

AWARDS BANQUET & KEYNOTE ADDRESS by Andy Woodruff, Web Cartographer - 'Expressive Cartography with Code'
Expressive Cartography with Code

Keynote Speakers
avatar for Andy Woodruff

Andy Woodruff

Web Cartographer
Andy Woodruff is a cartographer working on bespoke interactive maps with Axis Maps, a fan and mapper of Boston-area geography, an organizer of Maptime Boston, an active member of NACIS, and a promoter of geobeers on Wednesdays.


Tuesday November 7, 2017 6:30pm - 8:00pm
TBA

8:00pm

 
Wednesday, November 8
 

7:30am

Continental Breakfast
Wednesday November 8, 2017 7:30am - 8:30am
TBA

7:30am

8:45am

Esri Technical Session. Statistical Analysis using R
AUTHOR: Tom Schwartzman, Esri

ABSTRACT: In this session, you will get an introduction to how you can combine the power of ArcGIS and the R language bridge to solve complex spatial problems.

Wednesday November 8, 2017 8:45am - 9:15am
Salon IV

8:45am

CONCURRENT USER SESSIONS
Wednesday November 8, 2017 8:45am - 10:15am
TBA

8:45am

Workshop. Building GIS 101
AUTHORS: Alisa Morrison, City of Pawtucket

ABSTRACT: This session is geared towards municipalities, non-profit agencies and and any other organization that is just beginning to develop or consider building a Geographic Information System. The session will cover such topics as:1) How do I build capacity? 2) How do I start organizing my data structure? 3) What kind of data do I need and where do I get it? 4) Hardware/software…Whats my budget? Among other topics. The session will consist of speakers from different organizations along with a panel discussion to help new GIS managers to plan, develop, implement and maintain a GIS for their organization.

Wednesday November 8, 2017 8:45am - 10:15am
Salon I

8:45am

Workshop. Managing Enterprise Data for Collector
AUTHORS: Michael Mannion*, Mannion Geosystems

ABSTRACT: Collector for ArcGIS is an increasingly popular tool for extending data maintenance capabilities to mobile GIS staff. The simplicity of the end user experience, however, belies the myriad choices that data managers face when configuring their enterprise data for use with Collector. This session provides an overview of data management considerations and recommends best practices for organizations seeking to incorporate Collector for ArcGIS into their enterprise GIS environment. Topics include: publishing geodatabases to ArcGIS Online; online and offline mobile editing; working with subtypes, domains, and feature templates; versioning and archiving workflows; database, service, and portal security; and editing related data. Attendees should have a basic familiarity with ArcGIS. Demonstrations will focus on use cases involving enterprise geodatabases.

Wednesday November 8, 2017 8:45am - 10:15am
Salon II

8:45am

Workshop. Using ArcGIS Online to Create Your Own Assessing Map Gallery
AUTHORS: Angelo Marino, City of Nashua, NH

ABSTRACT: Most jurisdictions have the ability to utilize ArcGIS Online but are unaware of how to use it in conjunction with their CAMA (Computer Assisted Mass Appraisal) system to produce intelligent maps for an assessor's office to visualize property data, sales, neighborhoods, etc. and also perform quality control to increase assessment efficiency. The presentation will show how to use your CAMA data and GIS data to produce out of the box maps and apps to examine, display and quality control your assessment data.

Wednesday November 8, 2017 8:45am - 10:15am
Salon III

8:45am

9:15am

Esri Technical Session. Smart Mapping and Symbology with Arcade
AUTHOR: Tom Schwartzman, Esri

ABSTRACT: Arcade is an expression language that can be used across the ArcGIS Platform. Whether writing simple scripts to control how features are rendered, or expressions to control label text, Arcade provides a simple scripting syntax to deliver these capabilities. In this session you will get an introduction to the Arcade expression language, learning how to create portable scripts authored in ArcGIS Pro that can be can be read and executed in a WebMap through a browser, or in a Mobile Application.

Wednesday November 8, 2017 9:15am - 9:45am
Salon IV

9:45am

Esri Technical Session. WebGIS Administration with the Python API
AUTHOR: Jeff Bigos, Esri

ABSTRACT: The ArcGIS API for Python is a Python library for working with maps and geospatial data, powered by web GIS. It provides simple and efficient tools for sophisticated vector and raster analysis, geocoding, map making, routing and directions, as well as for organizing and managing a GIS with users, groups and information items. Get a quick introduction to this powerful API in this session.

Wednesday November 8, 2017 9:45am - 10:15am
Salon IV

10:00am

Refreshment Break
Wednesday November 8, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
TBA

10:30am

Esri Technical Session. Mobile Workflows with ArcGIS Collector, Workforce, and Navigator
AUTHOR: Mark Scott, Esri

ABSTRACT: ArcGIS field apps help you use the power of location to improve coordination and achieve operational efficiencies in field workforce activities. Reduce or even replace your reliance on paper. Ensure that everyone, in the field and the office, uses the same authoritative data so you can reduce errors, boost productivity, and save money. See three of these apps; Workforce, Navigator, and Collector, in a set of demonstrations and discussions to get you started.

Wednesday November 8, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Salon IV

10:30am

CONCURRENT USER SESSIONS
Wednesday November 8, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
TBA

10:30am

Panel. Municipal GIS Process and Policy: It’s the people, no matter how cool the technology!
AUTHORS: Judy Colby-George*, Spatial Alternatives; M. Nasir Shir, City of Portland, ME; Rosemary Mosher, City of Auburn, ME

ABSTRACT: This panel will discuss best practices and lessons learned from a combined total of 70 years of GIS experience. We represent a variety of sizes of municipal government. No matter how great the technology, how cool the application, it all depends on the people. How do we expand use of geospatial technology? How do we use geospatial tools to encourage citizen participation? Are there any best practices for various levels of government? Which walls do you keep running into? These and other questions will be covered during this panel discussion. We look forward to active participation from the audience.

Wednesday November 8, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Salon III

10:30am

Workshop. We've Got The Numbers! Understanding and Finding Census Data, and Mapping It
AUTHORS: David J. Kraiker*, Alexandra S. Barker – U.S. Census Bureau

ABSTRACT: This workshop is divided into 4 sections: (1) An introduction that describes the difference between Census (Decennial) data and American Community Survey Statistics--a survey that has deep demographics (2) How to search for data and interpret the different tables (3) How to Map the data found in American Factfinder (portal), and (4) exercises given to those in the audience so that they may practice what was taught. Attendees are urged to bring their devices.

Wednesday November 8, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Salon II

11:00am

Esri Technical Session. Form-based data collection with Survey 1-2-3
AUTHOR: Mark Scott, Esri

ABSTRACT: Come see Survey 1-2-3, the form-based solution for field data collection. Learn how to quickly design powerful surveys and publish them into ArcGIS, use the field app to get the answers you need to make the best decisions. Use Excel to create multi-page, intelligent forms to make the field collection more efficient and intuitive.

Wednesday November 8, 2017 11:00am - 11:30am
Salon IV

11:30am

Esri Technical Session. Monitoring GIS Data with Operations Dashboard
AUTHOR: Mark Scott, Esri

ABSTRACT: In this session you will see how to set up Operations Dashboard for ArcGIS using a Windows app or browser-based application to create executive dashboards that integrate maps, lists, charts, and gauges for real-time operation views. Learn about the upcoming plans for the Operations Dashboard by getting a sneak peak at the Beta release.

Wednesday November 8, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Salon IV

12:00pm

Conference Adjourns
Wednesday November 8, 2017 12:00pm - 12:00pm
TBA